Warning: Loveladies Beach Driving

Heads up for those 4 x 4 going to Loveladies. The beach about one block north of the public tennis court access ramp in Loveladies is almost unpassable. The beach is very narrow there, extremely wet and soft, with most of it sloped downward. I got stuck really bad and had to get towed off. While stuck, I watched another 4×4 try to make it only to get hung up and then turn around. Then the truck that came to pull me out got hung up in the same spot and had to turn around. He had to approach us from the north, coming in at East Coast Ave. I have been driving the beach for years and have never seen a spot like this. I now call my truck the “sand trap” LOL

Screaming drags,

Capt. Alex

609 548-2511

Lighthouse Sportfishing

Youtube: Fishing Barnegat Bay

Lighthouse Sportfishing Report

Been out almost every day except for today Sunday, which I will get to later. Inlet and back bay bassing is where it should be this time of year. Play the tides and time right and you can almost count on enough action to make you want to come back for more. Friday’s trip with John Lopez Ona proved that point. I had him into bass on plugs, Midway Lure’s JB Swimmer, before sun up. Once the fish moved down the water column as the day got brighter we switched over to the live stuff which proved more than effective. What was great was, I stuck tags in two fish over 28” to be hopefully caught another day. Catch, tag, photo, & release. I like it. See photo of John with a 29” bass before I stuck a tag in it. Based on the results of this Saturday/Sunday’s Sea Shell Tournament if looks like we are starting to see the first wave of bigger fish come within striking distance. There was something like 245 anglers that weighed in 69 bass. The winning fish was 51.60 lbs., and there were 9 fish in the 40 to 50 lbs. range. Being a member of the Beach Haven Charter Fishing Association I was at the tournament ceremony Sunday afternoon at which the association was presented with a check for $50,000 to go towards the purchase and deployment of two tug boats to be part of the artificial reef system off the southern portion of LBI.

On the nature side of things: NJ’s coastal waters are void of any natural reef system. Our coastal bottom consists of plain old sand, silt, and clay, with some high points and low points. Reefs, be it natural or artificial, not only provide a hard substrate for fish, shellfish and crustaceans, fishing grounds for anglers, and underwater structures for scuba divers, but they are nursery grounds for countless marine organisms. Our reef system is strategically located along the coast so that at least one reef site is within easy boat range of 12 New Jersey ocean inlet. Unfortunately, artificial reefs do not last forever. They sink, break down or get buried by sand. We, the recreational anglers are the ones that need to continue to support and fund this program so that future generations can continue to benefit from the bounties that artificial reefs support.

Capt. Alex
609-548-2511

Lighthouse Sportfishing Report

Well the recent weather pattern has been less that favorable most days for fishing, however, fish like most migratory organisms use internal and external cues and may move regardless of weather. Case in point, stripers the past week. The northern NJ coast saw an influx of great numbers of quality fish in the 20-40 pound plus fish. I can tell you this, we have the bait so once those fish slide our well fishing will be nothing but world-class. Locally, the inlet and back are providing ample opportunities on bass from 20” to 30” or more. Artificials are working at times, but live bait such as spots are not failing to produce. Saturday morning’s trip produced 10 bass to 28”. I am sailing every day right now and still have dates available including magic hour trips. If you want to get penciled in let me know.

On the nature side of things: Something I do almost on a daily basis I participate in “citizen science”. Citizen science is powered by individuals, communities/organizations, or global science research conducted by citizens. In my one attached picture, you will see an American Littoral Society (ALS) spaghetti tag behind the dorsal fin of one of the striped bass I tagged an released on Saturday. This is one of the examples of citizen science I am involved in and have been for over 40 years now! I have to purchase the tags myself, funded by you when you take a trip with me. Two recent returned fish came within 10 miles of where they were tagged and were recaptured within three months of being rereleased. You see, catch and release works when you handle your fish with care. There are so many ways you can get involved, just do it. OK, I’ll get off my soapbox now. LOL

Screaming drags,

Capt. Alex
609-548-2511

Lighthouse Sportfishing

Youtube channel: Fishing Barnegat Bay

Lighthouse Sportfishing Report 9/23/19

Well, summer has given way to fall, how’d that happen? Well, I know how it happened, but just like came upon us was too fast. Fluke season ended this past Saturday. Quite frankly during the last two or more weeks, I have hardly even fished for fluke during my trips. No, I don’t have flukophobia I have a recipe to have light tackle fun with blues to three pounds and schoolie bass on poppers, And this action is sometime mid-day! And in the backwaters
I can honestly these trips have consistently produced. It might get slow for a while, but after making some minor adjustment is game on! Again The exciting news is a somewhat respectable showing of weekies, many of which are in the 3-5 lb. range and some pics of one pushing seven. Local keeper bass have started to the mullet run and I know of several fish of 28”. Not much to report on the beachfront as we hand what seems to rip currents for two weeks straight now. Running every day now so just pick up the phone and get on the schedule. Fishing is great right now!

Scream drags,

Capt Alex.
609-548-2511
Lighthouse Sportfishing

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Lighthouse Sportfishing Report 7/28/2019

The warmer ocean water has brought in some cool stuff. Saturday, we scored this nice Mahi (pic attached) within a few miles of the inlet. We also boxed two chicken dolphin (small Mahi). There were many more Mahi swimming below the Debbie M, but they had lockjaw or were full. The latter likely being the case because when I cleaned them, their bellies were jam-packed of 1-2’ herring. Also saw flying fishing around the ridge and tons of small bonito. Note: if you are seeing flying fish there, there may be Mahi or kingfish (king mackerel) around. Then on today’s outing in the bay, we landed a sharksucker (aka remora). See pics attached. OK, enough about the cool stuff, how about a report? Blowfishing is still strong as is fluke fishing. Tons of small fluke, just need to go big or go home empty cooler type of fluke fishery. Small blues are still present and resident bass are acting like it is summer out. Wait, it is summer. You can catch bass if you want, but need to play your cards right. Still, have not given weakfish a shot.

On the nature side of things: for some reason, the bay is clearer this summer than in many years past. Not complaining, but why? Usually, the bay visibility decreases during the summer as the water warms and the algae population goes through the roof. This roof blowing off growth is often fueled by nutrient-laden stormwater runoff from lawn fertilizer after rain events. Lots of rain events that cause unnatural algae blooms, as it has been doing for decades. Well, we have had the rain, so why no algae blooms? Being a scientist I need data to support any claims about anything. Without data, I can only theorize, or speculate. So here are some suspects: Oyster Creek power plant shut down in September 2018 and is not discharging 110 million gallons of extra warm water into the bay daily; we are getting betting with fertilizer use and stormwater management; filter-feeding bivalves, clams, and oysters, are making a comeback which helps to naturally filter the bay; or with better fisheries management bunker, which are also feeders, are also making a big comeback. Could be any of these, or none, or a combination, but we will have to wait for Mother Nature’s right-hand man, Father Time, to shed some clarity.

Screaming drags,

Capt. Alex
609-548-2511
Lighthouse Sportfishing
YouTube Channel: Fishing Barnegat Bay

Lighthouse Sportfishing Report 7/10/2019

Barnegat Bay has warmed up into the upper 70’s deg F. Still has a way to go. Some years I’ve recorded temps in the mid 80’s F. The ocean along the surf for the most part in in the low to mid 70’s F. But don’t let the surface temp fool you as there is colder water closer to the bottom. Five days ago I had readings around 58 F coming over the north jetty towards the end of incoming. One good day of hard south winds will be sure to coll things off.

With the bay heating up, so is the fluking. Tons of shorts to bend rods and enough keepers in the mix if you work the right tides. Below are summer regulars over years, Justin and Alex S from Ohio.  Have not had any luck with the resident bass lately, but then again I have not fishded for them in the wee hours of the morning. Still tons of blues around. In and around the inlet is holding the smaller ones with the five pound + fish holding closer to structure.

I ran my first “off the beach sharking” trip yesterday. We fished off the beach, but the sharks seemed to be elsewhere. Been doing these trip for a few years playing catch & release with brown sharks in the 40-60 lb range and this is the first time I’ve been skunked. Hey but that why some say they call it fishing, not catching.

With so much variety (fluke, bluefish, blowfish, off the beach sharking and now ridge trips for bonito, spanish macks and false albacore) in our local water I truly can personalize a trip that is right for you or your family.

Screaming drags,

Capt. Alex
609-548-2511

Lighthouse Sportfishing

Lighthouse Sportfishing Report 7/1/19

Hope you all enjoy your Fourth of July! Fluking in the bay has definitely been on the upswing, however, with the recent NW winds traditional drifting was not the way to go. Power drifting, aka slow trolling, is the way to go when the wind is up to much or you are faced with wind against tide. The resident bass has been hard to come even with live bait like bunker or Atlantic thread herring (threadfin: pic below). Thread herring, say what? Thread herring occasionally come up to NJ waters. Last time I saw them in good numbers off our coast had to be about 10 years ago. They are a primo live bait in Florida and run around 7”-8”. If you see something on the surface that you think are bunker and you can’t snag one to save your life they are likely threadfins. You can’t snag or cast net them. The best method is a Sabiki rig. You need a good livewell to keep them happy. Still lots of blues around although Saturday’s trip was slow on the bluefish front. Sunday’s trip land a bunch in the 5-6 lb. range.

Have dates open and I always personalize your trip, so give me a call to get out fishing.

Screaming drags,

Capt. Alex
609-548-2511

Lighthouse Sportfishing.com